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  • NEW TITLES
  • Environmental History Monographs
  • Environmental History Collections
  • Environmental History Readers
  • Environmental Philosophy
  • Geography/Anthropology
Recent titles include Paul A. Elliott’s wide-ranging study of British street trees in the long nineteenth century, British Urban Trees. A Social and Cultural History. c. 1800–1914. This book is the first major study of British urban arboriculture between 1800 and 1914 and draws upon fresh approaches in geographical, urban and environmental history. It makes a major contribution to our understanding of where, how and why trees grew in British towns in the period, the social and cultural impact of these and the attitudes taken towards them.

In another 2016 publication, The Eclipse of Urbanism and the Greening of Public Space: Image Making and the Search for a Commons in the United States, 1682–1865, Mark Luccarelli roots the rise of environmental awareness in the political and geographical history of the US. Considering history in terms of the categorical development of space – social, territorial and conceptual – the book examines the forces that drove people to ignore their surroundings by distancing culture from place and by assiduously advancing the dissolution of social bonds. Leona Skelton’s Tyne after Tyne: An Environmental History of a River’s Battle for Protection 1529–2015. (forthcoming, 2017) offers a template for a future body of work on British rivers that dislodges the Thames as the river of choice in British environmental history. And it undermines traditional approaches to rivers as passive backdrops of human activities. Departing from narratives that equated change with improvement, or with loss and destruction, it moves away from morally loaded notions of better or worse, and even dead, river.

In anthropology, we have a new title for 2017 on the perennially relevant topic of conflict in Africa. Gufa Oba’s Herder Warfare in East Africa presents a regional analysis of the spatial and social history of warfare among the nomadic peoples of East Africa, covering a period of 600 years. The long dureé facilitates understanding of how warfare among pastoralist communities in earlier centuries contributed to political, economic and ethnic shifts across the grazing lands in East Africa.

Our series of environmental history readers, ‘Themes in Environmental History’, continues with Farming, which addresses ‘the link between the landscape and nutrition’, the complex set of factors by which food production results from human knowledge of, interaction with and attempted mastery of the natural environment. The story of farming, very broadly, is one of evolution from subsistence to industrialisation, an evolution which - as the present volume explores, taking its cases from such diverse times and places as the pre-modern Alps, colonial Brazil and twentieth century Australia – has often severely challenged ecological and cultural equilibrium.

British Urban Trees Farming The Eclipse of Urbanism and the Greening of Public Space British Urban trees Herder Warfare

The White Horse Press has recently reprinted The Subterranean Forest, Rolf Peter Sieferle’s landmark study of the industrial revolution transition to fossil-fuel energy, more relevant than ever as the need to evolve beyond this system becomes increasingly urgent. Our current series of monographs includes detailed studies of environmental history in particular areas as well as wide-ranging thematic volumes. Among the former are Enclosing Water (2010) by Stefania Barca, an environmental history of the Industrial Revolution, as inscribed on the Liri valley in Italy’s Central Apennines; Wapulumuka Oliver Mulwafu’s Conservation Song: A History of Peasant-State Relations and the Environment in Malawi, 1860–2000 (2011), and Lajos Rácz’s The Steppe to Europe: An Environmental History of Hungary in the Traditional Age (2013), the only English-language study of the environmental history of Hungary. The latter include two volumes on mountains – Marco Armiero’s A Rugged Nation: Mountains and the Making of Modern Italy (2011) and John Mathieu’s comparative history of mountains in the modern era The Third Dimension (translated from the German, 2011); and John Dargavel and Elisabeth Johann’s history of forestry Science and Hope: A Forest History (2013), named by Choice as an ‘outstanding academic title’. In a similar scholarly but accessible vein, Ian Rotherham’s Eco-history: An Introduction to Biodiversity and Conservation (2014).

2016 sees the publication of Paul Elliott’s British Urban Trees. A Social and Cultural History. c. 1800–1914. This book is the first major study of British urban arboriculture between 1800 and 1914 and draws upon fresh approaches in geographical, urban and environmental history. In another 2016 publication, The Eclipse of Urbanism and the Greening of Public Space: Image Making and the Search for a Commons in the United States, 1682–1865, Mark Luccarelli roots the rise of environmental awareness in the political and geographical history of the US. Considering history in terms of the categorical development of space – social, territorial and conceptual – the book examines the forces that drove people to ignore their surroundings by distancing culture from place and by assiduously advancing the dissolution of social bonds.

Leona Skelton's Tyne after Tyne: An Environmental History of a River’s Battle for Protection 1529–2015. (forthcoming, 2017) offers a template for a future body of work on British rivers that dislodges the Thames as the river of choice in British environmental history. And it undermines traditional approaches to rivers as passive backdrops of human activities. Departing from narratives that equated change with improvement, or with loss and destruction, it moves away from morally loaded notions of better or worse, and even dead, river.

The Subterranean Forest Enclosing Water Conservation Song The Steppe to Europe A Rugged Nation The Third Dimension Science and Hope Eco-History British Urban trees The Eclipse of Urbanism and the Greening of Public Space British Urban trees

Edited collections from The White Horse Press include the 2006 essay collection Soils and Societies, which explores the multi-faceted relationship between human culture and soils, across nations and eras; the highly topical Environmental and Social Justice in the City, edited by Geneviève Massard-Guilbaud and Richard Rodger (2011); and Thinking Through the Environment, edited by Timo Myllyntaus, which offers global perspectives on the intersections of mind and environment across a variety of disciplines, from history to politics to the visual arts. Wild Things: Nature and the Social Imagination, edited by William Beinart, Karen Middleton and Simon Pooley (2013) is a collection of essays on human constructions of Nature.

A Fairytale in Question: Historical Interactions between Humans and Wolves, edited by Patrick Masius and Jana Sprenger (2015), is a collection of essays that aims to grasp the maincurrents of thought about interactions with the wolf in modern history. International in range and chronological in organisation, this volume roots study of human–wolf relationships coherently within the disciplines of environmental and animal history for the first time.

Fluid Frontiers: New Currents in Marine Environmental History, edited by John Gillis and Franziska Torma (2015), studies the history, meaning and materiality of the marine environment. Here the history of oceanic sciences meets that of literary and artistic imagination, offering vivid insights into the meanings as well as the materiality of waves and swamps, coasts and coral reefs.

Soils and Societies Environmental and Social Justice in the City Thinking Through the Environment Wild Things A Fairytale in Question Fluid Frontiers

Our series of environmental history readers, suitable for students, is attracting increasing attention from course-designers. Comprising essays selected from our journals, Environment and History and Environmental Values, each inexpensive paperback volume addresses an important theme in environmental history, combining underlying theory and specific case-studies. The first volume, Bio-invaders (2010) investigates the rhetoric and realities of exotic, introduced and ‘alien’ species; the second, Landscapes (2010) explores the conceptualisation of environments as landscape, philosophically and historically; while the third, Indigenous Knowledge (2012) investigates how indigenous peoples from various cultures interact with and conceptualise their environments. Animals, examining human relationships with non-human others, and exploring dynamics of exploitation, preservation and cultural interpretation, appeared in 2014. Trees (2015) addresses the roots of environmental history in forest history, the power-relations that have been and continue to be played out in global forests and the psycho-social importance of trees. Farming, published in 2016, addresses ‘the link between the landscape and nutrition’, the complex set of factors by which food production results from human knowledge of, interaction with and attempted mastery of the natural environment.

Bioinvaders Landscapes Indigenous Knowledge Animals Trees Farming

We have a modest environmental philosophy list: in 2012 we reissued the classic essay collection by Richard Sikora and Brian Barry, Obligations to Future Generations (Temple University Press 1978; The White Horse Press 1997 and 2012). Dominic Hyde’s Eco-Logical Lives, an intellectual biography of Richard Sylvan (some of whose environmental philosophy books were published by The White Horse Press) and Val Plumwood, appeared in 2014. In 2015 we published Anne Frank’s Tree. In this important and original interdisciplinary work, Eric Katz explores technology’s role in dominating both nature and humanity in a meditation on the opposing themes of domination and autonomy as they relate to the uses of technology in environmental policy and in the genocidal policies of the Holocaust.

Obligations to Future Generations Eco-Logical Lives Anne Frank’s Tree

Collections integrating anthropology and geography are Changing Deserts: Integrating People and their Environment, edited by Lisa Mol and Troy Sternberg (2012) and Modern Pastoralism and Conservation: Old Problems, New Challenges, edited by Troy Sternberg and Dawn Chatty (2013, originally published in China). Aligned with our new journal, Nomadic Peoples, our short anthropological list also now includes Dawn Chatty’s From Camel to Truck, a republication of a seminal 1986 work. Forthcoming in 2017 is an important study of the social and spatial history of tribal conflict, Herder Warfare in East Africa by Gufu Oba.

Changing Deserts Modern Pastoralism From Camel to Truck Herder Warfare

 

Books can be ordered through any bookseller or from our distributors, Turpin Distribution, by phone (+44 (0) 1767 604951), email, user-friendly e-commerce site, http://ebiz.turpin-distribution.com/.

We anticipate gradually augmenting this list over time and are always interested in high quality proposals. You can download our book proposal form as a Word document or PDF, or contact Sarah Johnson at the address below to discuss your idea.


Gufu Oba, Herder Warfare in East Africa.
Mark Luccarelli, The Eclipse of Urbanism and the Greening of Public Space.
Leona J. Skelton, Tyne after Tyne.
Themes in Environmental History 5. Farming.
Paul A. Elliott, British Urban Trees. A Social and Cultural History. c. 1800–1914.
Themes in Environmental History 5. Trees.
Themes in Environmental History 4. Animals.
Themes in Environmental History 3. Indigenous Knowledge.
Themes in Environmental History 2. Landscapes.
Themes in Environmental History 1. Bioinvaders.
Dawn Chatty, From Camel to Truck: The Bedouin in the Modern World.
Troy Sternberg and Dawn Chatty (eds), Modern Pastoralism and Conservation: Old Problems, New Challenges.
Lisa Mol and Troy Sternberg (eds), Changing Deserts: Integrating People and their Environment.
Eric Katz, Anne Frank’s Tree. Nature’s Confrontation with Technology, Domination, and the Holocaust.
Dominic Hyde, Eco-Logical Lives. The Philosophical Lives of Richard Routley/Sylvan and Val Routley/Plumwood.
Richard Sikora and Brian Barry (eds), Obligations to Future Generations.
John Gillis and Franziska Torma (eds), Fluid Frontiers: New Currents in Marine Environmental History.
William Beinart, Karen Middleton and Simon Pooley (eds), Wild Things: Nature and the Social Imagination.
Patrick Masius and Jana Sprenger (eds), A Fairytale in Question: Historical Interactions between Humans and Wolves.
Timo Myllyntaus (ed.), Thinking Through the Environment: Green Approaches to Global History.
Geneviève Massard-Guilbaud and Richard Rodger (eds), Environmental and Social Justice in the City
J.R. McNeill and Verena Winiwarter (eds), Soils and Societies: Perspectives from Environmental History.
Rolf Peter Sieferle, The Subterranean Forest: Energy Systems and the Industrial Revolution.
Ian Rotherham, Eco-history: An Introduction to Biodiversity and Conservation.
John Dargavel and Elisabeth Johann, Science and Hope: A Forest History.
Jon Mathieu, The Third Dimension: A Comparative History of Mountains in the Modern Era.
Marco Armiero, A Rugged Nation: Mountains and the Making of Modern Italy.
Lajos Rácz, The Steppe to Europe: An Environmental History of Hungary in the Traditional Age.
Oliver Mulwafu, Conservation Song: A History of Peasant-State Relations and the Environment in Malawi, 1860–2000.
Stefania Barca, Enclosing Water: Nature and Political Economy in a Mediterranean Valley, 1796–1916. Winner of the 2011 Turku Book Prize.